The Weekly – Reshuffling our packs, with a ‘poor man’s Robin Reliant’

Published on 19-09-2021 08:11:10

As Boris reshuffled his cabinet, we were picking and mixing as other reordering took place. Grant Shapps has announced a major revamp of Britain’s COVID-19 quarantine traffic lights, though the nation is said to be short of 50,000 doctors. Rising food and drink prices pushed up inflation by a record amount in August to hit a nine-year high but unemployment fell amid a hiring spree and UK house prices suffered their biggest monthly fall since 1992 as the stamp duty holiday taper calmed the market. As we celebrated scrapping three-quarters of the world’s planned coal-fired power stations since 2015’s Paris Treaty on climate change, Britain prepared to pay huge sums to its last coal plants to keep the nation’s lights on.

RESPONDING TO CONSUMERS’ CHOICE

As John Lewis announced 7,000 Christmas jobs, Marks & Spencer shut 11 stores in France because of Brexit. While pounds and ounces are to make a comeback, we’re saying hello again to crowns being stamped on pint glasses but waving goodbye to paper driving licences. British Airways prepared for a lower-carbon world by flying its first plane on cooking oil, while it was revealed that one in three Britons now drink plant-based milk. The United States took sporting equality to a new level by offering its women’s soccer team the same contract as for the men. Emma Raducanu returned from her US Open triumph $2.5m richer but said she couldn’t find a tennis court to book after her victory inspired the country to pick up its rackets.

SHOWING OUR STAYING POWER

This grateful gamer came up with his own epitaph after Sir Clive Sinclair’s obituary said his achievements in creating the world’s first pocket calculator and kick-starting the home computing revolution were eclipsed by the commercial failure of his C5 electric three-wheeler, a vehicle ridiculed as ‘the poor man’s Robin Reliant’. And this 101-year-old Maine fisherwoman who picked her first snapping lobster out of the Atlantic in 1928, is still at it, with no plans to retire.

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